hybrid homeschool

Our Loose Homeschool Schedule

I am a scheduler at heart.  I love color coordinated calendars.  I love to know what is coming, what is expected and I typically thrive when there is more to do.  HOWEVER.  I also need downtime, time to reflect and process and freedom within my well planned schedule to breathe, reassess and just let us all be.  Which is one of the many reasons I love homeschooling and the freedom it affords each member of our family.  

Some new things we incorporated this year: 

*Table time for the 3 year old - a lot of great ideas out there, but essentially 45 minutes - 1 hour where the 3 year old plays at a small table quietly with things only brought out during table time, so I can work with the older two on combined subjects (map work, Classical Conversations memory work, presentation preparation, etc.)  

*Rotations for the big kids to play with the 3 year old - this worked in 30 minute increments, long enough for me to complete 1-2 teaching subjects with each of the older two kids one-on-one

*An electives only co-op because having a house of highly active boys, and needing a little differentiation in age-appropriate activities I will gladly pay $10-$35/month for science, PE, art and more.  It has been a gift to us this winter/spring!

*Morning time! - time together every morning we are at home, which realistically boils down to 2-3 mornings/week where we read scripture, share a devotional, study a character trait, talk through an etiquette lesson, read poetry, and then a chapter or two from our current read aloud.  We might cover map work or a few pieces of memory work review during this time.  The only time I require them to give me complete attention is during Bible, devotional & character.  After that, they are allowed to work on/play with something quietly while I read or we discuss.  I try to rotate things in the basket that are available each week just for this time (dot to dot, cars, hand puzzles, jar of shells, etc).  I love pambarnhill.com and appreciate all the things, especially her morning time suggestions/plans as well as A Handbook for Morning Time by Cindy Rollins.  

Our schedule started off ...super scheduled.  Time windows, back to back, and motivation to finish promptly which equated to a few free minutes outside or doing something of their choice.  It worked well at first but I felt bound, without freedom to fluctuate between subjects if needed or give the kids a longer break if necessary; this was confusing to them to deviate from the schedule even if we really really needed to deviate from the schedule.  

So then what?  We adjusted :) 

Before you read ahead to what OUR day looks like, this is in no way to try and force your family into our mold nor lead you down a path of comparison.  Our "average day at home" is about 2-3 days a week.  Full of mini breaks, moments of correction, and getting off track often.  Each year when I evaluate our schedule I am constantly searching for ways to improve, whether adding more or taking away or changing it up altogether; that's all this is for.  To show another means of "how".  

Our average day at home looks a little like this: 

7ish - breakfast

8-9ish - all morning chores/responsibilities completed; I read and puzzle with the 3 year old if he's feeling social :) 

9ish - Morning Time!  **I mean, sometimes morning time didn't start until 10.  Sometimes I just needed longer for coffee.  Or someone soiled clothes and I had to get a load of wash in, which means I didn't get dressed when I'd hoped.  Or let's be honest, some days during this pregnancy I just plopped right back in bed and let the kids play.  Be. Free.  To wake up, assess the day, and reevaluate what best suits the needs and emotions of all those precious people in your house...including yourself :) 

10ish - Snack & some sort of review/presentation topic discussion.  Or a few moments for me to switch out laundry, take a bathroom break, check my email.  

10:30ish - 3 year old plays on his own or has Table Time.  This is a stretch for me because Table Time inevitably means playing with all the things in all the ways that make all the messes.  I try to ignore and limit correcting/instructing if it's not a life or death situation.  2nd Grader goes to a quiet place to go through all morning work subjects that do not require my help (includes: LifePac, Handwriting, Math Worksheet, Spelling Worksheet, two pages of Review from his Classical Conversations Cycle 3 note booking pages).  I work with Kindergartener on as much as I can get through in half an hour - usually starting with Math.  

11ish - Kindergartener needs a BREAK or is sometimes finished for the day so he plays with the 3 year old while I work on 1-2 subjects with the 2nd Grader

11:30ish - everyone is cranky and begging for food so I send them outside or to their room/basement to play basketball while I make lunch

*in an ideal world we are finished with school by lunchtime.  Some days this happens..others we all need food and a nap so we tack on some more later in the day.

12ish-  lunch

12:30ish - nap time for the 3 year old!  (and all the people said amen)  Reading/spelling lesson with kindergartener if not completed earlier while 2nd grader has free time or works on something he didn't finish earlier

1ish - everyone has quiet time for an hour and a half...or longer if needed...

2:30/3ish - Finish up last 2-3 subjects with 2nd grader if it's one of those days, otherwise...freedom!!  

The reality is - seasons change.  Life with littles is tough!  Give yourself grace, give your kids grace and worst case take them all to chick fil a and the library and call it a field trip + life skills lesson while looking for books ;) 

Kindergarten and 2nd Grade Roundup

Woo!  May is here which means school is almost not here - or maybe it's already left your house for the summer :)  Either way, we are celebrating with completing books, finishing up our tests and looking back on goals planned and now achieved.  

Which inevitably means - time to look at options for next year!  As registrations quickly approach along with all those terrific homeschool resale pop-ups I thought I'd offer a peek into what our kindergarten and 2nd grade roundup look like.  

If you are new to homeschooling or just getting your feet wet with the idea - be encouraged: It does not have to be hard.  You don't have to compete with the school system at large; you get to choose what works best for YOU and YOUR family!  You get to use all the "transition time" that takes up a large portion of the public school day and let them learn at their own pace, pursue their personal interests, help them catch up in areas of weakness, challenge their strengths and offer them a taste of truth, goodness and beauty in the every day.  

So on to the good stuff....

Kindergarten!  About 45 minutes - 1 hour a day of direct one-on-one teaching time...

Handwriting - A Reason for Handwriting

Math - Saxon 1

Reading: started with Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons then eventually moved on to any level one readers from the library

Spelling - All About Spelling

Classical Conversations Cycle 3 - incorporated during our morning time, copy work found on Half A Hundred Acre Word and several fill in the blank options from CC Connected

The End :) 

 

Second Grade: About 1 1/2-2 hours of direct one-on-one teaching time

Handwriting - started with a Reason for Handwriting cursive; wasn't a great fit this year so we switched to Handwriting Without Tears and it's been a night and day difference.  

Math- Saxon 3 (finished up from last year) and Intermediate Saxon 4

Reading - Sonlight Readers - they offer a great online assessment to evaluate which level to pursue with your reader; the chapters for 4th Grade increased significantly in length so we followed our own schedule and will finish these through the summer.  

Spelling - Sequential Spelling

Classical Conversations Cycle 3 - incorporated during our Morning Time, copy work found on Half a Hundred Acre Wood and several fill in the blank options from CC Connected

Language Arts - Writing With Ease (we stopped after week 24; it wasn't a favorite for both of us and we were able to incorporate similar ideas and concepts in our other books) & First Language Lessons 3 (this is going to last us through next year as well so we only did about 2 lessons a week after we got into the diagramming of sentences).

History - LifePac Grade 3

 

That's really all there is to it!  The kids get science, art & PE at our co-ops, and we will use Apologia Science Jr Notebook Journal for our summer studies.  Of course there are plenty of games, lots of reading aloud, music studies and all the things that make up our school day that can't be quantified into a textbook.  That's the beauty and hybrid bit of homeschool for us!  

If you're looking for an idea of a daily schedule, visit this post, Our Loose Homeschool Schedule 

 

 

 

Those Early Years - Part 2

As mentioned last week, there is just all the grace and flexibility in the world to let those little years stay filled with wonder and discovery.  The way we approach “school” during the four-five years involve a lot of hands-on, everyday life with a seasonal stack of “extras” that might include cut and paste, sorting, tracing, early handwriting, etc.  If it gets by us one day, or a week, there is no stress.  If there is extra interest and excitement to do more in one day, then we do more.  But for the most part, I follow their pace.

*for one of my children’s Pre-K Year I did intentionally try and have him complete one or two school related tasks a day.  The only purpose of this was to instill in him the habit of listening to my teaching and understanding that there are set expectations for school; it had very little to do with academics.  

*We are also part of a co-op that starts at age 4; We don’t do much with review until their second year, but they retain so much of it anyways!  Review time is always incorporated as a family and largely led by books we check out that pertain to the material.  

Here we go!  

Favorite Curriculum & Websites

**again, used loosely.  I print things off monthly and keep a big stack in a folder for each age and pull out as desired.  

1+1+1

This Reading Mama

Read Aloud Revival

 We love Zaner Bloser for beginning handwriting and their 1st book is a great start.  That could be a post in and of itself - reading and writing and when to start.  

 

Favorite Toys for Pre-K:

Dollar Tree Buys:

Corn and beans in a tray or small bin

Pom Poms to sort, put in and out of containers, etc.

Pipe Cleaners with letter beads

**I made a ton of busy bags one time for my first born; but was reminded that boys are just a little different when it comes to quiet time play and almost everything I made was either destroyed or reconstructed to be something else, so I let that one go...  

 

 

 

 

Hybrid Homeschool 101

Hybrid Homeschool 101:  How did we get here.  

Want in on a little secret?  This whole Hybrid Home thing actually started out with far more narrow of a vision.  Narrow as in: The Hybrid Homeschooler.  It’s a whole thing, you know?  Staying home with your kids, trying to stay sane and teach them and feed them and keep them alive all at the same time and stuff.  I called up a sweet friend (the gracious kind that is willing to talk to you for hours on end while you drive your 3 kids home from Georgia in the middle of the night) and said “I HAVE OUR BLOG IDEA.  THE HYBRID HOMESCHOOLER!”  To which she replied… “THAT’S AWESOME!!!  But I don’t homeschool!”

Which really, that’s kind of where all of my thoughts landed that night prior to calling her - I am in fellowship and in community with some amazingly beautiful, talented, gifted women who are clothed in strength.  Determined to fight for their family, advocate for their children and give their all day in and day out.  And the funny thing?  We don’t all match.

This summer was the first time I found myself on the side of the conversation in which moms were asking ME questions about how to homeschool.  What curriculum we use, what our schedule looks like.  I’ve been around the block a time our two just talking screen time and chore charts.  Responsibilities.  Structure.  Socialization.  I absolutely love my days with my boys - hard.  But good.  And I absolutely love talking homeschool.  But really our choices and reasons for homeschooling and the curriculums we’ve chosen are things I’ve been picking and choosing from- a blend that is tailored to our family.  A hybrid, one might say (see what I did there?).  And at the end of every conversation there was kind of this sinking feeling, like I didn’t have enough to offer them.  That I just wasn’t going to help them see the big picture.  There was this voice inside me that wanted to just shout YOU. DO. YOU!  BE FREE!  And just do you really well.  Because truthfully, at the end of the day, as much as we know in our heads that not every child fits in a box…neither do us mamas.  

In typical kind-gracious-loving fashion, my friend heard me out - but took it further to not just the homeschooling mom of 3.  But into every area that we’re tempted with the lie … “you should be doing more.”  

Thus, The Hybrid Home was birthed. 

I love essential oils.  But I also really love Children’s Motrin.  And bug spray.  

I use Norwex for just about everything.  Along with toilet bowl cleaner and bleach.  

It is a fact: You will not lose your salvation if you’re vegan one day and throw a whole chicken + 1 stick of butter in the crock pot the next.  #balance

I can feed my family well 95% of the time but like, some nights it’s Tyson chicken nuggets prayed for and anointed with holy oil.  

I could go on and on and on, about all the hybrid up in this home.  Not from a place of discontentment or striving for the next best thing - I most certainly once was - but now, rather from a place of complete peace in knowing who I am, and who I am not.  And being ok with both.  

Sweet friends, our hope for you as your peruse and mingle about The Hybrid Home is that you would be filled with the encouragement that you are uniquely made to be you.  There is not another like you.  And while the world tries to tell us that we have to be all organic, or all oily, or all vegan and completely Charlotte Mason or 100% classical, off the grid or on, a complete extrovert or none whatsoever, we so desire for you to know that it’s ok to mix it up.  It’s ok to say you hate science experiments and prefer readalouds.  It’s ok to be a screen free family but let your kids binge watch cartoons on Saturday mornings.  Whole foods it as much as possible, but if the McDonalds drive thru is what is going to set a better tone in your home then go big and upsize.  Send one to school and homeschool another.  Be free of the constant yammering soapboxes coming from the internet and hold on tight knowing that the Creator God has allowed you to bring glory to Him in a way that is unique to you and your family.  And just do you - really really well.  

“a person who fears the Lord avoids all extremes.”  Ecclesiastes 7:18

xoxo

L